Psychology plays into marketing, even in the smallest choices. This week, let’s talk about the psychology of typeface.

Different typeface and font choices conjure specific reactions in a reader. Serif fonts – like Times New Roman, Georgia, or Cambria – have a level of formality best for the content body. Sans-serif fonts – such as Calibri, Verdana, or Trebuchet MS – are more simple and informal. Script-like fonts have a feminine and fancy image, making them great for invitations but perhaps not the right choice for copy. Decorative and Display fonts are memorably used in headlines and large sizes, but are overkill for long copy. Modern fonts are cool and distinct, but should ideally match the tone of the message or company.

When using typeface to foster emotion, the logo and headline are typically where it happens. In those areas, we can make an impression with an impactful font before we get down to business in the body of the content.

When using typeface to foster emotion, the logo and headline are typically where it happens. Click To Tweet

From there, personal fonts draw us in with a sense of familiarity or traditional fonts give us a sense of distance. The next time you decide on a font, take a quick look and describe it with the first adjective that comes to mind. This may well be the impression you are giving to the reader.

Typeface is one of the many aspects of branding. Read more here about what your branding says about your business.